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Posts Tagged ‘flowers’

Floral Friday

Geraniums must be one of the easiest flowers to grow.  Once they’re established they require no attention except perhaps an occasional deadheading.  This one is grows outside the fence, suffers traffic and demolition dust, and flowers all year round.  The only water it gets comes from random rainfall, and a rare dose of worm pee.  It has special significance because it was originally a cutting from my friend Carol’s garden.

There is a legend that the prophet Mohammed came down from the mountain and hung his sweaty shirt on a geranium growing next to his tent.   The geranium held the shirt up to the sun until it was completely dry.   At that time geraniums were considered weeds, but Mohammed was so pleased with the service the geranium had provided he covered it with velvety red blossoms that filled the air with fragrance.

“This plant needs only easy care
there are few others that compare.”

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Floral Friday

The first hollyhocks are flowering in our garden.  Each year I scatter the seeds of the old plants, and each year new ones appear.  Luckily the small plants are easily identifiable so they don’t get mistaken for weeds.  So far this year they are mainly pink, but there is one red one.  You might enjoy this story of hollyhocks in the days of U.S. slavery.

“I like the stately hollyhock
just perfect for a Cottage block.”

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Floral Friday

This sage plant was rescued from a neighbour’s garden when their house was about to be demolished, and it’s flourishing at our place.

Sage has been used as a medicine and a preservative as long as any other herb.  Egyptians used it as a fertility drug in the first century C.E.  Sage was highly revered by the Greeks and Romans, who first used it as a meat preservative, and believed it could enhance memory.   Arabian healers of the 10th century believed that eating it would grant immortality, and Europeans four centuries later used it to ward off witchcraft.  Three cases of tea leaves were reportedly traded for one case of sage leaves by 17th century Chinese because they appreciated sage tea.  A drink made from sage leaves is called ‘Thinkers’ tea’ and is reputed to cure depression.  The sage plant is said to have protected Mary and the infant Jesus when they were being sought by King Herod.

It’s part of the mint family and related to rosemary.  It’s botanical name Salvia Officinalis comes from the Latin salvere meaning to be well.

“So if your memory fades with age
perhaps you should be eating sage.’

 

 

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Floral Friday

This group of smiling pansies greets me as I come in the back gate.  This year they are more prolific than ever.

The pansy is the symbol of free thought, because of both its name and appearance.  The name comes from the French word pensée, which means “thought”.  The flower resembles a human face, and it nods forward as if deep in thought.  The French believed that pansies could make your lover think of you.

In ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream’, the juice of a pansy flower (“before, milk-white, now purple with love’s wound, and maidens call it, Love-in-idleness”) is a love potion: “the juice of it, on sleeping eyelids laid will make or man or woman madly dote upon the next live creature that it sees.” (Act II, Scene I).

“Each pansy has a smiling face
they make our world a happy place.’

 

 

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Floral Friday

I love lupins.  They are such a stately flower, and look great in a vase.   In some of our wilderness areas they’ve taken over and are considered a pest, but they are are a vital part of any cottage garden, and I enjoy having them in mine.

“My lupins are a stately flower
a purple bee-attracting tower.”

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Rioting Rose

Lavender Dream makes a beautiful show in our back garden.

We planted this Cottage Rose in 1995.  It was one of several we bought from Egmont Roses, who I understand have now closed down.  Lavender Dream flowers for months, it’s only assistance a good annual prune.

“This rose is simply just a dream
and one I hold in high esteem.”

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Roadside Roses

This rosebush is flourishing on the side of Stanmore Road, opposite the Linwood Community Arts Centre.  It has an iron frame support, and fennel growing at its feet.  I haven’t seen a rose like this growing on a footpath before, have you?  Presumably it was planted by the Council.  I wonder if it has special significance.

“A rose the footpath here adorns
be careful, as there may be thorns.”

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