Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Avon’

This family with seven ducklings was swimming in the Avon/Otakaro river just west of the Madras Street bridge.  They’re the first I’ve seen.  It must be spring!

‘I always think it is good luck
to see a tiny baby duck.’

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Public finally have access to the area along Oxford Terrace between Cashel and Hereford Streets.  The Bridge of Remembrance is available once more.

Bridge of Remembrance

Bridge of Remembrance

Some people have asked why the “rusty” marks haven’t been removed.  The bridge is made from a Tasmanian stone which contains iron that sometimes leaches out, and this can’t be cleaned away.

For years I sat on these terraces to eat my lunch, and I’m pleased they’ve been replaced.

Oxford Terraces & Hereford Street Bridge

Oxford Terraces & Hereford Street Bridge

The new terraces have inscriptions.

Inscriptions on steps

Inscriptions on steps

This one reads “Ko Otakaro te ingoa, noku tenei whenua.”  My reo is very basic, but I think it means “My name is Otakaro (Avon), this is my land.”

On the west bank a descendant of the Gallipoli Lone Pine was planted last year to commemorate the centenary of the Gallipoli landings.  It has a strong protective covering.

Lone Pine behind fence

Lone Pine behind fence

“My lunch spot now has been renewed
and ducks again will beg for food.”

Read Full Post »

Fiona’s book is the story of Christchurch, from the very beginning, through the quakes, almost to the present day, with glimpses of a possible future.  I love the fact that she tells it exactly how I believe it is.  This is my story, and the story of so many of us.

There’s an emphasis on the Avon Loop because Fiona too has lived here.  She tells how Nova Place was once called York Street, then changed to Nova (which is Avon spelled backwards).  A 1980 city council report specifies forty-one local houses built before 1900.  Ours is one of those, and one of very few remaining now.  Fiona documents the process of zoning so much of the Avon Loop red, with an appraisal of this dubious process.  Reading it rouses my emotions, now less strong, but still active.  This is a book I hope everyone will read.  Fiona plans a companion fictional volume, and I look forward to that too.

In L’Aquila she observes another city shaken by earthquake in 2009, makes comparisons with Christchurch, and quotes Seneca on natural disasters.

There is reference to the Avon Motor Lodge’s chimney, a continual source of pollution over many years, and still a visual pollution.  Reference also to anger with the All Right? campaign, which some feel has gone on for too long.  Fiona explores the notion of home, and asks what happens when you cannot trust that home?  When it no longer offers that fundamental sensation of comfort, and we may lose our whole sense of who we are.

All of this is put in a political context in a way which matches my feelings.  Well done, Fiona!  I eagerly await the companion novel.

“My city’s story, clearly told.
How will its future now unfold?”

 

Read Full Post »