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Posts Tagged ‘arts’

Colourful Creature

This bright butterfly looks gorgeous on a wall in New Brighton.

I presume that’s a full moon above.  The artist is Cinzah.  He’s chosen my favourite colours for this one.

“I like this butterfly so bright
it is a most attractive sight.”

 

 

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Wheelie Wall

A new mural on the Worcester Boulevard depicts cycling in many forms.

It’s by Dside.  He portrayed all the riders naked in the hope that New Zealand might one day support the World Naked Bike Ride.  This mural has replaced the one with the melting penguins.

“I’m sad the penguins had to go
we’ll now enjoy the cycles though.”

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Ibis Illustrated

I love this attractive mural on the wall of the Ibis Hotel in Hereford Street.  The City Council held a competition between three designs to choose what would go up, and this was the winner (the one I voted for!).

Artist Brendan Warrell has depicted kowhai and a silvereye emerging from Christchurch rubble.

“It brightens up a central street.
Far better than that dull concrete.”

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We visited Loudon Farm to view the Sculpture on the Peninsula.  It was a somewhat fraught drive over Dyers Pass, on account of the number of cyclists on the narrow winding road, some of whom were inclined to ride two abreast.  We chose to return via Lyttelton and the tunnel.

Loudon Farm is always a pleasure to visit, with its magnificent grounds, historic buildings, and range of permanent sculptures, plus there were chooks!

Loudon Rooster

A display of photographs showed the damage done by flooding last July.  Trees had been clear felled in the Waieke Forest above the farm, and when the heavy rains came debris from the felling washed down and formed dams.  The water rose rapidly, broke through the dams, and debris crushed fences, carved out farm roads and paddocks, and flooded a cottage.  The farm is still littered with piles of logs over three metres high.  Waieke Forest have yet to take any responsibility for the damage and sad ecological consequences, partly caused by Ecan’s failure to monitor forest felling.

I was interested to see this commemoration.  It reads: “At this site on Monday 19 March 2012 a conspiracy of minds determined to save Christchurch Cathedral”

The sculptures on display seemed to me to be not as striking as in previous years (no daleks!).  The one I liked best was “Flight”.

Flight by Justin Galligan

The catalogue had photos of all the artworks, which helped with identifying my photos afterwards.  Here are some more of them:

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The exhibition is on tomorrow as well, and it’s well worth the drive.  There was plenty of food available at reasonable prices (with some queues), and music during the afternoon.

“To see such artworks you will find
is stimulating for the mind.”

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A strange building has appeared on the riverbank near the Hereford Street Bridge.  The Glass Pavilion by Gregor Kregear is part of the Scape Public Art 2017 season.

It’s constructed from industrial waste materials considered not to be of use or commercial value: bricks of recycled glass, salvaged timber, and re-purposed neon lights.  “The work seeks to acknowledge ways in which the fabric of the destroyed city has in some cases found a new purpose, and pay homage to the fortitude and resilience of Christchurch communities, while also encouraging us to pause to consider the new forms of architecture repopulating the built environment.”

Apparently it’s lit up after dark and looks amazing.  Definitely worth a nighttime drive past.

“This shelter with its wooden roof
would possibly not be rainproof.”

 

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These Tree Houses for Swamp Dwellers were installed in 2013.  I hadn’t realised until today that they had real grass, and of course it needs to be weeded occasionally.  That’s what these people appear to be doing.

“You would be pleased to see these fellas
if you were overgrown swamp dwellers.”

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An alternative cardboard cathedral was erected yesterday in the Market Square of the Arts Centre.  French artist Olivier Grossetete wanted to make something magical in the heart of the city.  With the help of many volunteers he used cardboard boxes and tape to create an exciting construction, which will be demolished at 3pm this afternoon.  It’s an interesting coincidence that this temporary cathedral was erected on the same day that the Anglican Synod finally made the decision to restore our Cathedral in the Square.

“A cardboard building led the way
while Synod members had their say.”

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