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Archive for the ‘Christchurch – wider’ Category

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This latest production of the Anthony Harper Summer Theatre is full of fun.  The young cast bring great energy as they portray a female Robin Hood and her circle of Merry Women in Burwood Forest.  Lots of literary allusions, parodies of well-known songs (I shot the Sheriff), and topical references.  It’s an excellent evening’s entertainment, and the setting amid the trees of Riccarton House is ideal.  Be sure to dress warmly – the weather was cool when we were there last night.

“This story with a female Robin
had songs that kept our heads a-bobbin’.”

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We stopped at Lyttelton’s quirky Shroom Room.   We just wanted hot drinks, but the food looked enticing (all vegetarian).  They did serve hot chocolate in a glass – not my choice, but there were chocolate buttons on the side to compensate.  There are several indoor rooms, plus outdoor tables in the adjacent Albion Square.

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Lord Lyttelton first visited the port that had been named after him on 5 February 1868.

“The food looked tasty to consume
at the character-full Shroom Room.”

 

 

 

 

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Coastline to Cass

The track from Lyttelton to Cass Bay is a short walk, about 2km, with impressive harbour views.  The track starts just above the Naval Point Yacht Club.  We’d thought we might swim at Corsair Bay but the day was not sufficiently warm.  There was even some light rain, but we were well sheltered by trees along the path.

Lyttelton marina

Lyttelton Marina

 

Cove between Corsair and Cass Bays

Cove between Corsair and Cass Bays

 

Harbour from above Cass Bay

Harbour from above Cass Bay

Cass Bay was named after Captain Thomas Cass who was the Canterbury province’s chief land surveyor from 1851 to 1867.

You can return along the road to Lyttelton, but we preferred to retrace our steps on the coastal path.

“It is an easy walk for most
this tree-lined path along the coast.

 

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We lunched at The Front Room.  This is a brand new cafe in the Mt Pleasant Community Centre, and definitely worth a visit.  Despite the wind we were happy to sit outside and enjoy the stunning view.

View from The Front Room

View from The Front Room

I had a bacon and egg slice and a hot chocolate, both of which were excellent.  I liked that they asked whether I wanted my chocolate in a mug or a glass.  I dislike hot chocolate in a glass, and have not been offered the choice before.  The taste was especially good because there were no marshmallows which are often served unasked.  I’m inclined to pop them in the chocolate, and then be sorry because it makes it too sweet.

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The Front Room closes at midday on Saturday and isn’t open on Sunday, which seems a pity.  Best to go on a weekday.

“I recommend the new Front Room
for food delicious to consume.”

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“How old is your cottage?” is a question we’re often asked.  It’s difficult to answer accurately, because the City Council’s building records don’t go back far enough.  The land on which the cottage stands was originally part of Town Reserve 21 and designated to become the Botanic Gardens.  When it was decided the gardens should be in Hagley Park the designation was changed to Reserve 63.  The first title for our small piece of land was issued in 1872 to Arthur Appleby, who also had many rural sections.  In 1877 he sold it to George Levitt Binning, a City Council Labourer, who we believe was the builder of this colonial cottage.  At first it would have consisted of just two rooms, and was probably constructed from a kitset, selected from a catalogue, and shipped from Australia.  It’s likely that it was erected by 1878, and we’ve recently put up a sign saying “Est. 1878” so that passersby can have an answer to their question.  Since the earthquakes there aren’t many cottages of this age left in the local area.

“Our cottage is extremely old
almost one-forty years we’re told.”

 

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Digital Directions

Suddenly every car I’m driven in seems to have some form of GPS direction finder.  In some cases you key the address you want into the TomTom.

TomTom

TomTom

In others you simply speak it out loud.  In both cases a female voice tells you in detail where you need to turn, which lane to be in, and which exit to take from the roundabout.  If an unexpected  road closure obliges you to disobey, they quickly compensate and issue new instructions.  I’ve also driven with someone using an app on their phone to get directions.  ‘They” tell me TomTom is cheap, easily updated, and will get you there faster.

I can see the attraction if you were in a strange area, but I always allow plenty of travel time, and plan to stick to my trusty map book for the forseeable future.  Do you have a digital driving assistant?

“Although it may be somewhat slow
my map book tells me where to go.”

 

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The temperature was 25 degrees at 9am, and 29 was forecast, so it was the perfect morning for an early swim.  Corsair Bay, just 14km from home, was the chosen spot.

Corsair Bay

Corsair Bay

As I approached the beach I met a couple coming out and asked them whether the approaching low tide (only two hours away) made it harder to swim.  They said it was fine, but a bit windy out past the boats.  I assured them I had no intention of going that far!  By the time I’d gone in a few metres the water was over my waist, so low tide was definitely not a problem.

I’m not much of a swimmer, and prefer to just float on my back, enjoying the view of trees, and being in the element of water.  A dog wearing a life jacket was sitting patiently on the beach.  Two paddle boarders approached the shore, the dog climbed on board with one of them and they all headed out.  I was sorry not to have my camera with me.

“At Corsair Bay, a dog at sea
was sailing along happily.”

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